Tag Archives: Ingredients

Flowers and starch – making Turkish delight

18 Nov
Turkish delight. Home made, no less.

Turkish delight. Home made, no less.

I was in Nargile for a slap-up feast in June. At the end of a meal, when we were all fit to burst, the temptress waitress brought in a small plate of Turkish delight with the bill. It was fabulous and I ate several pieces. I was reminded that good Turkish delight is a beautiful thing that I wanted to learn how to make. I’m talking about the original, gelatin-free version. It makes a nice gift and is my sweetheart’s favourite candy. So I scoured the Internet for instructions and set out to learn how to make perfect delight. Here is what I learned.

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Edinburgh’s best kept secret: Matthew’s Foods

15 Nov

I’d like to share what I think is one of Edinburgh’s best kept secrets. Take a trip with me to the Far East, okay the West of Edinburgh.

Matthew‘s Foods is chock full of all sorts of superb ingredients at the most reasonable prices. It’s great fun to explore. Some things are familiar, others are frankly weird and wonderful.

 

Matthews Foods Supermarket

Matthew's Foods Supermarket

 

From the outside you’d probably think it stocks just Chinese ingredients. Not so. You’ll find just about any ingredient you could possibly wish for whether you are cooking Indian, Thai, Korean, Japanese, British and of course, Chinese.

Just inside the front door you’ll find the fresh produce – plenty of unfamiliar and more recognisable items.  Ahead you’ll find aisles of produce  – each aisle seems to gather ingredients from a different cuisine together – this can be a little confusing as you can find coconut for instance  in several different places.

 

Spices from Matthew's Foods

Spices from Matthew's Foods

 

The ingredients are ridiculously cheap, and are offered in small, medium, large and enormous bags. I look at huge bag of cumin seeds and wonder how many years it would take me to get through it and it’s less than £5. There are bags of nuts – a kilo of cashews at little more than you’d pay for 250 grams in a high street supermarket.

At the back there are frozen items – intriguing dumplings, dim sum, seafood, fish and meats – what fun to have a party to try them all out.

In another aisle, teas and dried mushrooms. You often catch yourself wondering exactly what such and such is.  Near the exit, you can find utensils, cleavers, steamers and other kitchen bits and pieces.

I’m a regular visitor and always astonished how little I spend when I’ve stocked up on  umpteen things. There, it’ll be a best kept secret no longer.

So take a little trip to the orient, it’s such fun and very easy on your purse.

Matthews Foods

36 Inglis Green Rd
Edinburgh, City of Edinburgh EH14 2ER
0131 443 8686

The most seasonal restaurant in Edinburgh?

9 Nov

Many restaurants proclaim they use local, seasonal ingredients. I think I have found the most seasonal restaurant in Edinburgh.

The Atrium Edinburgh - Neil Forbes gathering ingredients

Neil Forbes gathering ingredients

Picture this. I am standing in the Atrium kitchen salivating as dish after dish of prime seasonal food is lovingly prepared: Organic chicken with cep and tarragon cream, Borders roe deer with red cabbage, plum and cinnamon; beef with a sticky unctuous gravy, roasted roots and buttery mash: Isle of Lewis Scallops, Stornoway black pudding and puree of Lewis’ apples (he’s the Maitre D). The atmosphere is calm. Staff coming on shift have checked out the ingredients and cooking methods for tonight’s dishes in case the diners quiz them. The pot washer is rattling into an alarmingly high pile of dishes. A huge stock pot is being fed with roasted bones, trimmings and vegetables and set on to cook for about 12 hours. Continue reading

Whatever happened to… Jacques, The Backstage Bistro and La Bagatelle

4 Nov

 

Map of Tollcross showing the locations of the three restaurants mentioned in this article.

You turn your back for a year or two and suddenly your favourite restaurant is no more.

 

Edinburgh has a lot of restaurants so competition must be fierce. New restaurants open all the time and old ones die and disappear. Sometimes it’s obvious why a restaurant isn’t successful, at other times it is a mystery. Recently, I was walking around Tollcross looking for something to eat and found that some of my favourite restaurants had stopped serving, and another one had gone to seed. The question is why?

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Mincepies – heaven or hell? Make your own mincemeat

1 Nov

I want you to make your own mincemeat

Make my own mincemeat?  What on earth for? I can hear you cry.

 

Freshly bottled mincemeat

Freshly bottled mincemeat

 

Well, to impress and show off, of course. And, once you’ve eaten a mince pie with homemade mincemeat, you’ll never eat another shop bought again. Guaranteed.

It’s getting on for that time of year when it’s difficult to avoid the mince pie – you know those utterly dry, weird tasting things that are supposed to sum up the Christmas spirit – I think they actually sum up the Scrooge sort of Christmas spirit – mean and grumpy. Continue reading

Veggie heaven – a vegetarian’s guide to Edinburgh

26 Oct
Henderson's Restaurant

Henderson's Restaurant - steep stairs and good food

A couple of months ago, I wrote about L’Artichaut, a great little French vegetarian restaurant in Stockbridge. At the start, I listed several good vegetarian restaurant and it struck me that a quickie-guide, a longer article that gives a bit more detail, would be useful. Here is a review of three of them: Ann Purna, Black Bo’s and Henderson’s

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Christmas Cake – no excuses, you can make your own

24 Oct

A really good Christmas cake is within your grasp. This is a really easy recipe that is quite forgiving if you don’t have exactly the right ingredients. If you have to substitute anything, just ensure it weighs the same. First of all you gather all the ingredients and let them seep in alcohol for a week. You make an easy cake mix and combine the two and cook – simple. Do make this as soon as you can, to allow it to mature.

You’ll need a square cake tin about 20cm across and baking parchment or greaseproof paper.

For the soak

500 grams of raisins
200 grams of currants
100 grams of chopped dates
50 grams of dried cherries (not glace) if you can’t find these, use dried cranberries
3 tablespoons of each of the following: brandy, kirsch, whisky, port and water. You can use rum, Cointreau, grand marnier or sherry instead. Or, if use the 12 tablespoons of one alcohol and 3 of water)
1 teaspoon each of ground cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves
1 teaspoon of vanilla essence (the pure sort)
1 tablespoon of dark brown sugar (or demerara)

Method

In a saucepan, put all the ingredients and warm through until the sugar is dissolved. Take off the heat and let it cool.
Scrape all of the ingredients into a box with a lid and put into the fridge. Try to remember to shake the box each day.
A week later, you are ready to make the cake. You’ll notice that the dried fruit has plumped up and smells wonderful!

Cake ingredients

250 grams self-raising flour (or plain plus 2 tsp baking powder)
250 grams soft brown sugar (or Demerara)
250 grams of butter
5 large eggs beaten
50 grams of mixed nuts

Method

Mixing the fruit and cake mixture together

Mixing the fruit and cake mixture together

Before you start making the cake, grease your tin and line it with greaseproof paper or parchment. Turn the over on to Gas mark 3, 170 degrees.

For ease, make the cake in a food processor or use a hand-held whisk.

Whisk the butter and sugar together until well mixed, Add a little flour. Add the eggs little by little until all used up. Spoon in the flour and mixed nuts. Put this mixture into a large mixing bowl with the fruit that’s been soaking and mix well.

The cake mixture in the lined tin

The cake mixture in the lined tin

Carefully spoon the mixture into the tin, making sure that your lining stays stuck to the edges of the tin.

Cook for approximately 2 1/2 hours. PLEASE CHECK REGULARLY. The cooking time seems to vary greatly – particularly if you have a fan oven. Use a skewer to test if it is ready – it should come out clean.

When it is done, leave it in the tin until cold. Turn out and store in silver foil until needed.

Store the cake in foil until needed

Store the cake in foil until needed