Archive | fish RSS feed for this section

The sea in a pot – Mussel Inn, Edinburgh

5 Feb
Mussel shells. I eat too quickly to photograph my dinner sometimes.

Mussel shells. I eat too quickly to photograph my dinner sometimes.

I was reminded of how much I enjoy oysters when I tasted some lovely plump ones from AnCuig Seafoods at the Scottish Food show last week. So when it was suggested that we go to Mussel Inn for dinner Friday night I knew immediately what my starter would be. The Mussel Inn isn’t one of the places that AnCuig supplies, and I’m not going to discuss the relative values of oysters, but I will wax lyrical over a meal of molluscs. Ah, a beautiful thing, the mollusc, when fresh, sea-scented and accompanied by a clean white wine.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Absolutely the dog’s! – Seadogs, Edinburgh

21 Dec
Going to The Dogs. But first, Seadogs.

Going to The Dogs. But first, Seadogs.

Seadogs is a fish restaurant in the popular and successful Dogs chain. The Dogs, the first in the series, offers amazing rustic dishes based on cheap and unusual cuts. It was so popular that they opened Amore Dogs, an Italian version of the original concept. The latest restaurant focuses on fish. I went there for pre-Christmas cheer with a couple of friends a positively balmy if snowy evening in December.

Continue reading

A flavour thesaurus – definitely a good idea

22 Nov
The sides and back of Niki Segnit's The Flavour Thesaurus

Niki Segnit's The Flavour Thesaurus is a pleasure to handle and to read.

It was my birthday recently. And for my birthday I got many wonderful presents, some of which you will hear about later. Today, I want to spread the word about a wonderful book. Not only is it pretty, it is also funny, inspiring and ingenious. There are no recipes, as such, but there are ideas aplenty. I’m talking about Niki Segnit’s The Flavour Thesaurus.

Continue reading

What’s in season? October

11 Oct

 

October produce at Edinburgh's Farmers' Market

October produce at Edinburgh's Farmers' Market

 

It’s autumn, but still warm. We’ve the tail end of the summer produce (those with greenhouses are probably still picking peppers and tomatoes) and some new autumnal favourites inspiring me to make soup and simmer long cooked stews. I’m also really enjoying the figs from Turkey and contemplating how to make the most of a gift of quinces.

Fruit and Vegetables

Fennel (baby and full size); Beetroots; Broccoli, Dirty carrots (always the best, they keep so much longer); squashes in all shapes and sizes; Leeks, Pumpkins, Onions, Spinach; Swiss chard, Parsnips, Quinces, Wild Mushrooms, Figs, plums, pears.

Meat and Fish

Crab, Sole (Dover, Lemon), Lobster,  Squid, Mallard, Goose, Guinea Fowl, Chicken, Veal, Beef,

RECIPE

Poached figs

This is so easy, quick and delicious (adapted from a Waitrose recipe)

 

Poached Figs

Poached Figs

 

Serves 2

4 large figs (just wash gently, no other preparation needed)
1 orange juice extracted and zest grated
100 grams soft brown or demerara sugar
4 cardamon pods crushed
300 ml water
Greaseproof or non-stick paper

Find a saucepan that the figs fit snugly into. You do not want it to be too big as they will not stay immersed during cooking.

Put everything except the figs into the saucepan and bring to the boil. Turn down the gas so it is just bubbling. When the sugar has dissolved, put the figs into the liquid.
Bring back to a good simmer (lots of bubbles, not boiling).

Place a circle of greaseproof paper over the figs to ensure they stay mostly under the water.

Cook until soft. This will depend on how ripe your figs are – mine took about 10 minutes -they should be soft to the touch.

Remove the figs to the bowl you’ll eat from and boil the syrup to reduce it by half. Cover the figs with the sauce and add ice cream or cream.

Marrakesh – where you should eat (pt 2)

1 Oct

In the second of two reports from Marrakesh,  you’ll find some tips about eating out.

Mint Tea

Mint Tea

Marrakesh has large numbers of riads, perhaps 200 or more. Enterprising owners have refurbished, extended and embellished houses in the oldest parts of town to provide luxurious accommodation. The riads Mr EF and I came across were in quiet locations and in many cases down a maze of tunnels – do arrange to be collected from the airport it is extremely difficult to find where you are going the first time!

Apart from being wonderful places to stay, riads are often the very best places to eat as they have their own dedicated chefs. You don’t have to be staying  at the Riad, but you must pre-book by lunchtime at the latest – just ask someone from where you are staying to book for you they will be happy to do so. When you arrive, just mention the name of where you are staying rather than your own name.  I suggest doing a bit of research – by all means use your guidebook for some tips, but bear in mind they will be out of date. Check out recent reviews on Trip Advisor to ensure which are the very best to try. There are other restaurants in the old quarter, such as Le Foundouk but they are very tourist oriented and the food average (and terrible music). We spent a very enjoyable couple of hours with the Simbade the chef at the Riad El Rimal who very patiently explained how to make a fish and a meat tagine. We’re still experimenting with his recipes and will share them in another post.

Pastilla served as a starter - it is usually round

Pastilla served as a starter - it is usually round

Wherever to you do eat, you’ll find that tagines and couscous are staples on the menu. Do try the pastilla (or bastilla) if it is available. It’s an unusual mixture for British palates, but think of mince pies and you’ll do fine. It’s usually meat (usually pigeon) and almonds encased in a filo-like pastry, topped with icing sugar and cinnamon. Made well, it is delicious!

Vegetarian Sandwich at Cafe des Epices

Vegetarian Sandwich at Cafe des Epices

At lunchtime, try one of the wonderful Moroccan salads made with locally grown ingredients. You’ll find that are served hot (as in the picture below of a delicious tomato and pepper mixture with charmoula spice) as well as cold. Moroccan flavouring is subtle and it is all down to the expertise of the chef as to whether it is really delicious or simply OK.  If you’re hankering after a sandwich, Cafe des Epices is a great place to head to – they even have WIFI. Salads cost around 20 dirhams, tagines from 60 (there are currently 13 dirhams to a pound).

Pimento and Tomato "Salad"

Pimento and Tomato "Salad"

Whilst you won’t usually find fine dining in the old town, there are exceptions. We visit La Sultana on our last night. This is a fabulous hotel right next to the Saadian tombs (well worth a visit). You can dine on French haute cuisine, or take the opportunity to try a range of delicious Moroccan specialities with the most impeccable service and delightful music from an oud player. The prices are European, but well worth it for the ambiance and high quality food – you dine under the stars next to a pool.

La Sultana Hotel - view from our dining table

La Sultana Hotel - view from our dining table

And for those of you with a sweet tooth, do try the Marrakeshi equivalent of baklava.  These are delicious light pastries filled with nuts and fruits, flavoured with rose water – delicious with the ubiquitous mint tea or coffee

Sweet Pastries from Marrakech

Sweet Pastries from Marrakech

A word of caution. Street restaurants will display prices for food but not drinks. This is the way some make their money, literally making a price up on the spot for incautious tourists – watch out for this in Place des Ferblantiers in particular. You can of course eat out at the stalls in the main square (but with caution as I suggested in Part 1).

To stay in a riad, check out Luxury Riads

La Sultana (information on the accommodation only)

Riad Al Rimal Cookery course available (in French only)

Selling seafood on the seashore – The King’s Wark, Edinburgh

21 Sep
Smoked hake with brown prawn butter on black pudding and mashed potato. It's a mouthful.

Smoked hake with brown prawn butter on black pudding and mashed potato. It's a mouthful.

We’re so close to the sea that you would expect good seafood in Edinburgh. And you can certainly get it, from fancy restaurants in town to the pubs on the shore of Leith, seafood and fish are ubiquitous. Last weekend I took a leisurely walk down to Leith and visited three of the bar-cum-restaurants down there, finally eating in the King’s Wark.

Continue reading

No more over-powering sauce please!

16 Sep

Wild mushrooms in sauce, gardnished with a second sauce

Wild mushrooms in sauce, garnished with ... a second sauce

You source the best ingredients you possibly can, prepare them with delicacy and respect, heat them just so and serve them covered in sauce. Loads of sauce. Richly flavoured sauce. And there they lie, languishing in a sea of flavour, their own flavour lost.

Continue reading